Posted by: RAM | September 30, 2013

Tuesday (October 1): “Jesus’ face was set toward Jerusalem”

Mabuhay at Mabuting Balita!
Month of the Most Holy Rosary
Memorial of Saint Thérèse of the Child Jesus, Virgin and Doctor of the Church 
Tuesday in the Twenty-sixth Week in Ordinary Time
86 Days Before Christmas

You ask me a method of attaining perfection. I know of love – and only love. Love can do all things.  — St Therese of Lisieux  http://origin.ewtn.com/devotionals/inspiration_10oct2013.asp#1

First Reading:  Zechariah 8:20-23
Psalm 87:1-7
God is with us.
Gospel:
  Luke 9:51-56

When the days for Jesus to be taken up were fulfilled,
he resolutely determined to journey to Jerusalem,
and he sent messengers ahead of him.
On the way they entered a Samaritan village
to prepare for his reception there,
but they would not welcome him
because the destination of his journey was Jerusalem.
When the disciples James and John saw this they asked,
“Lord, do you want us to call down fire from heaven
to consume them?”
Jesus turned and rebuked them,
and they journeyed to another village.  http://usccb.org/bible/readings/100113.cfm

Video Reflection:  http://www  .usccb.org/bible/reflections/

Reflection:   Are you surprised to see two of Jesus’ disciples praying for the destruction of a Samaritan village? The Jews and Samaritans had been divided for centuries. Jewish pilgrims who passed through Samaritan territory were often assaulted. Jesus did the unthinkable for a Jew. He not only decided to travel through Samaritan territory at personal risk, but he also asked for hospitality in one of their villages! Jesus’ offer of friendship was rebuffed. Is there any wonder that the disciples were indignant and felt justified in wanting to see retribution done to this village? Wouldn’t you respond the same way? Jesus, however, rebukes his disciples for their lack of toleration.  Jesus had “set his face toward Jerusalem” to die on a cross that Jew, Samaritan and Gentile might be reconciled with God and be united as one people in Christ.

Tolerance is a much needed virtue today. But aren’t we often tolerant for the wrong thing or for the wrong motive? Christian love seeks the highest good of both one’s neighbor and one’s enemy. When Abraham Lincoln was criticized for his courtesy and tolerance towards his enemies during the American Civil War, he responded: “Do I not destroy my enemies when I make them my friends?” How do you treat those who cross you and cause you trouble? Do you seek their good rather than their harm?

“Lord Jesus, you are gracious, merciful, and kind. Set me free from my prejudice and intolerance towards those I find disagreeable, and widen my heart to love and to do good even to those who wish me harm or evil.” http://www.rc.net/wcc/readings/oct1.htm, www.dailyscripture.net Copyright@2013 Don Schwager

Saint of the Day:  St. Theresa of the Child Jesus, Patron of the Missions (18 73-1897)
“I prefer the monotony of obscure sacrifice to all ecstasies. To pick up a pin for love can convert a soul.” These are the words of Theresa of the Child Jesus, a Carmelite nun called the “Little Flower,” who lived a cloistered life of obscurity in the convent of Lisieux, France. [In French-speaking areas, she is known as Thérèse of Lisieux.] And her preference for hidden sacrifice did indeed convert souls. Few saints of God are more popular than this young nun. Her autobiography, The Story of a Soul, is read and loved throughout the world. Thérèse Martin entered the convent at the age of 15 and died in 1897 at the age of 24.

Life in a Carmelite convent is indeed uneventful and consists mainly of prayer and hard domestic work. But Theresa possessed that holy insight that redeems the time, however dull that time may be. She saw in quiet suffering redemptive suffering, suffering that was indeed her apostolate. Theresa said she came to the Carmel convent “to save souls and pray for priests.” And shortly before she died, she wrote: “I want to spend my heaven doing good on earth.”

[On October 19, 1997, Pope John Paul II proclaimed her a Doctor of the Church, the third woman to be so recognized in light of her holiness and the influence of her teaching on spirituality in the Church.

Her parents, Louis and Zélie, were beatified in 2008. http://www.americancatholic.org/features/saints/saint.aspx?id=1874

More Saints of the Day

Let me be the change I want to be. Even if I am not the light, I can be the spark. ram

Visit the blog site —  https://shechina.wordpress.com–for more readings for the day and your insights or follow us on Twitter —twitter.com/theonekin.  Please share with people you know and help spread the Word of God.

Lasallian Prayer:  Let me be the change I want to see. Even if I am not the light, I can be the spark. ram

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