Posted by: RAM | July 15, 2016

Saturday (July 16): Until Jesus brings justice to victory

Mabuhay at Mabuting Balita!
Month of the Most Precious Blood

Our Lady of Mount Carmel (Optional Memorial)
Saturday of the Fifteenth Week in Ordinary Time
Lectionary: 394

First Reading: Micah 2:1-5
Psalms 10:1-4, 7-8, 14Do not forget the poor, O Lord!
Gospel: Matthew 12:14-21
The Pharisees went out and took counsel against Jesus
to put him to death.

When Jesus realized this, he withdrew from that place.
Many people followed him, and he cured them all,
but he warned them not to make him known.
This was to fulfill what had been spoken through Isaiah the prophet:

Behold, my servant whom I have chosen,
my beloved in whom I delight;
I shall place my Spirit upon him,
and he will proclaim justice to the Gentiles.
He will not contend or cry out,
nor will anyone hear his voice in the streets.
A bruised reed he will not break,
a smoldering wick he will not quench,
until he brings justice to victory.
And in his name the Gentiles will hope.

http://www.usccb.org/bible/readings/071616.cfm orm

Reflection:  How do we achieve success and victory in our lives? In everyone’s life there are key moments or turning points on which the whole of one’s life hinges. The mounting confrontation between the Pharisees and Jesus was such a decisive event and crisis. The religious leaders became intolerant of Jesus because of their prejudice. Nothing that Jesus would do or say from this point on would be right in their eyes. They conspired, not simply to oppose Jesus but to eliminate him.

Courage and determination to do God’s will
Jesus met this defiance with courage and determination to do his Father’s will. He used the crisis to teach his disciples an important lesson for God’s way to success and victory. The only way to glory in God’s kingdom is through the cross – the cross of suffering and humiliation – which Jesus endured for our sake and for our salvation. We, too, are called to take up our cross every day – to die to sin, selfishness, envy, pride, strife, and hatred – and to lay down our lives in humble service and love for one another, just as Jesus did for our sake.

Matthew quotes from the “Suffering Servant” prophecies of Isaiah to explain how Jesus the Messiah would accomplish his mission – not through crushing power – but through love and sacrificial service (Isaiah 42:1-4). In place of a throne Jesus chose to mount the cross and wear a crown of thorns. He was crucified as our Lord and King (John 19:19; Philippians 2:11) There is no greater proof of God’s love for us than the sacrificial death of his only begotten Son for our sake and our salvation (John 3:16).

Jesus died not only for the Jews but for all the Gentile nations as well. Isaiah had prophesied centuries before, that the Messiah would bring justice to the Gentiles. To the Greek mind, justice involved giving to God and to one’s fellow citizen that which is their due (whatever is owed to them). Jesus taught his disciples to give God not only his due, but to love him without measure just as he loves us unconditionally – without limits or reservation.

Justice tempered with love and mercy
Jesus brings the justice of God’s kingdom tempered with divine love and mercy. He does not bruise the weak or treat them with contempt, but rather shows understanding and compassion. He does not discourage the fainthearted but gives hope, courage, and the strength to persevere through trying circumstances. No trials, failings, and weaknesses can keep us from the mercy and help which Jesus offers to everyone who asks. His grace is sufficient for every moment, every situation, and every challenge we face. When you meet trials and difficulties, do you rely on God’s help and grace?

“Lord Jesus, your love and mercy knows no bounds. Give me strength when I am weak, hope when I am discouraged, peace when I am troubled, consolation when I am sad, and understanding when I am perplexed. Make me an instrument of your love and peace to those who are troubled and without hope.” http://www.rc.net/wcc/readings/jul16.htm  www.dailyscripture.net author Don Schwager © 2016 Servants of the Word

Saint of the Day: Our Lady of Mount Carmel
Hermits lived on Mount Carmel near the Fountain of Elijah in northern Israel in the 12th century. They had a chapel dedicated to Our Lady. By the 13th century they became known as “Brothers of Our Lady of Mount Carmel.” They soon celebrated a special Mass and Office in honor of Mary. In 1726 it became a celebration of the universal Church under the title of Our Lady of Mount Carmel. For centuries the Carmelites have seen themselves as specially related to Mary. Their great saints and theologians have promoted devotion to her and often championed the mystery of her Immaculate Conception.

St. Teresa of Avila called Carmel “the Order of the Virgin.” St. John of the Cross credited Mary with saving him from drowning as a child, leading him to Carmel, and helping him escape from prison. St. Therese of the Child Jesus believed that Mary cured her from illness. On her First Communion day, Therese dedicated her life to Mary. During the last days of her life she frequently spoke of Mary.

There is a tradition–which may not be historical–that Mary appeared to St. Simon Stock, a leader of the Carmelites, and gave him a scapular, telling him to promote devotion to it. The scapular is a modified version of Mary’s own garment. It symbolizes her special protection and calls the wearers to consecrate themselves to her in a special way. The scapular reminds us of the gospel call to prayer and penance—a call that Mary models in a splendid way. http://www.americancatholic. org/Features/Saints/saint.aspx?id=1446

More Saints of the Day
St. Athenogenes
Bl. Bartholomew of Braga
St. Carmen
St. Domnio
St. Fulrad
St. Helier
St. Marie Magdalen Postel
St. Marie St. Henry
St. Mary Magdalen Postel
St. Reineldis
St. Tenenan
St. Valentine
St. Vitalian

Let me be the change I want to be. Even if I am not the light, I can be the spark.  Follow Tweets by @TheOneKinEnt  @Pontifex @CardinalChito

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