Posted by: RAM | January 31, 2017

Wednesday (February 1): “A prophet is not without honor except in his native place.”

Mabuhay at Mabuting Balita
Month of the Holy Name
Wednesday of the Fourth Week in Ordinary Time
Lectionary: 325

First Reading: Hebrews 12:4-7, 11-15
Psalms 103:1-2, 13-14, 17-18:  The Lord’s kindness is everlasting to those who fear him.
Gospel: Mark 6:1-6
Jesus departed from there and came to his native place, accompanied by his disciples.
When the sabbath came he began to teach in the synagogue,
and many who heard him were astonished.
They said, “Where did this man get all this?
What kind of wisdom has been given him?
What mighty deeds are wrought by his hands!
Is he not the carpenter, the son of Mary,
and the brother of James and Joseph and Judas and Simon?
And are not his sisters here with us?”
And they took offense at him.
Jesus said to them,
“A prophet is not without honor except in his native place
and among his own kin and in his own house.”
So he was not able to perform any mighty deed there,
apart from curing a few sick people by laying his hands on them.
He was amazed at their lack of faith.
http://www.usccb.org/bible/readings/020117.cfm

Reflection:  Are you critical towards others, especially those who may be close to you? The most severe critics are often people very familiar to us, a member of our family, a relative, or neighbor or co-worker we rub shoulders with on a regular basis. Jesus faced a severe testing when he returned to his home town, not simply as the carpenter’s son, but now as a rabbi with disciples. It would have been customary for Jesus to go to the synagogue each week during the Sabbath, and when his turn came, to read from the scriptures during the Sabbath service. His hometown folks listened with rapt attention on this occasion because they had heard about the miracles he had performed in other towns. What sign would he do in his hometown?

Jesus startled his familiar audience with a seeming rebuke that no prophet or servant of God can receive honor among his own people. The people of Nazareth took offense at Jesus and refused to listen to what he had to say. They despised his preaching because he was a mere workman, a carpenter, and a layman who had no formal training by a scholar or teacher. They also despised him because of his undistinguished family background. How familiarity can breed contempt. Jesus could do no mighty works in their midst because they were closed-minded and unbelieving towards him. If people have come together to hate and to refuse to understand, then they will see no other point of view than their own and they will refuse to love and accept others. How do you treat those who seem disagreeable to you?

The word “gospel” literally means “good news”. Isaiah had prophesied that the Messiah would come in the power of the Holy Spirit to bring freedom to the afflicted who suffered from physical, mental, or spiritual oppression (see Isaiah 61:1-2). Jesus came to set people free – not only from their physical, mental, and spiritual infirmities – but also from the worst affliction of all – the tyranny of slavery to sin, Satan, and the fear of losing one’s life. God’s power alone can save us from hopelessness, dejection, and emptiness of life. The Gospel of salvation is “good news” for everyone who will receive it. Do you know the joy and freedom of the Gospel?

“Lord Jesus, you are the fulfillment of all our hopes and desires. Your Spirit brings grace, truth, freedom, and abundant life. Set my heart on fire with your love and truth.” http://dailyscripture.servantsoftheword.org/readings/2017/feb1.htm copyright (c) 2016 Servants of the Word, source:  www.dailyscripture.net, author Don Schwager

Saint of the Day: St. Brigid of Ireland, Patron of Ireland, dairymaids, cattle, midwives, Irish nuns, and newborn babies (451-525)
Saint Brigid was born Brigit, and shares a name with a Celtic goddess from whom many legends and folk customs are associated.

There is much debate over her birthparents, but it is widely believed her mother was Brocca, a Christian baptized by Saint Patrick, and her father was Dubthach, a Leinster chieftain. Brocca was a slave, therefore Brigid was born into slavery.

When Dubthach’s wife discovered Brocca was pregnant, she was sold to a Druid landowner. It is not clear if Brocca was unable to produce milk or was not present to care for Brigid, but legend states Brigid vomited any food the druid attempted to feed her, as he was impure, so a white cow with red ears sustained her instead.

Many stories of Brigid’s purity followed her childhood. She was unable to keep from feeding the poor and healing them.

One story says Brigid once gave her mother’s entire store of butter, that was later replenished after Brigid prayed.

When she was about ten-years-old, Brigid was returned to her father’s home, as he was her legal master. Her charity did not end when she left her mother, and she donated his possessions to anyone who asked.

Eventually, Dubthach became tired of her charitably nature and took her to the king of Leinster, with the intention of selling her. As he spoke to the king, Brigid gave his jeweled sword to a beggar so he could barter it for food for his family. When the king, who was a Christian, saw this, he recognized her heart and convinced Dubthach to grant her freedom by saying, “Her merit before God is greater than ours.”

After being freed, Brigid returned to the Druid and her mother, who was in charge of the Druid’s dairy. Brigid took over and often gave away milk, but the dairy prospered despite the charitable practice, and the Druid eventually freed Brocca.

Brigid then returned to Dubthach, who had arranged for her to marry a bard. She refused and made a vow to always be chaste.

Legend has it Brigid prayed that her beauty be taken so no one would want to marry her, and the prayer was granted. It was not until after she made her final vows that her beauty was restored.

Another tale says that when Saint Patrick heard her final vows, he accidentally used the form for ordaining priests. When the error was brought to his attention, he simply replied, “So be it, my son, she is destined for great things.”

Little is known about Saint Brigid’s life after she entered the Church, but in 40 she founded a monastery in Kildare, called the Church of the Oak. It was built above a pagan shrine to the Celtic goddess Brigid, which was beneath a large oak tree.

Brigid and seven friends organized communal consecrated religious life for women in Ireland and she founded two monastic institutions, one for men and one for women. Brigid invited a hermit called Conleth to help her in Kildare as a spiritual pastor.

Her biographer reported that Brigid chose Saint Conleth “to govern the church along with herself.”

She later founded a school of art that included metalwork and illumination, which Conleth led as well. It was at this school that the Book of Kildare, which the Gerald of Wales praised as “the work of angelic, and not human skill,” was beautifully illuminated, but was lost three centuries ago.

There is evidence that Brigid was a good friend of Saint Patrick’s and that the Trias Thaumaturga claimed, “Between St. Patrick and Brigid, the pillars of the Irish people, there was so great a friendship of charity that they had but one heart and one mind. Through him and through her Christ performed many great works.”

Saint Brigid helped many people in her lifetime, but on February 1 525, she passed away of natural causes. Her body was initially kept to the right of the high altar of Kildare Cathedral, with a tomb “adorned with gems and precious stones and crowns of gold and silver,” but in 878, during the Scandinavian raids, her relics were moved to the tomb of Patrick and Columba.

In 1185, John de Courcy had her remains relocated in Down Cathedral. Today, Saint Brigid’s skull can be found in the Church of St. John the Baptist in Lumiar, Portugal. The tomb in which it is kept bears the inscription, “Here in these three tombs lie the three Irish knights who brought the head of St. Brigid, Virgin, a native of Ireland, whose relic is preserved in this chapel. In memory of which, the officials of the Altar of the same Saint caused this to be done in January AD 1283.”

A portion of the skull was relocated to St. Bridget’s Church and another was sent to the Bishop of Lisbon in St. Brigid’s church in Killester.

Saint Brigid’s likeness is often depicted holding a reed cross, a crozier, or a lamp. http://www.catholic.org/saints/saint.php?saint_id=453

More Saints of the Day:
Bl. Luigi Variara
Bl. Andrea Carlo Ferrari
Bl. Andrew of Segni
Bl. Anne-Francoise de Villeneuve
Bl. Anne Hmard
Bl. Anthony Manzi
St. Brigid
St. Brigid of Ireland
Bl. Catherine Cottenceau
St. Cinnia
St. Crewanna
St. Darulagdach
Bl. Francoise Bonneau
Bl. Francoise Michau
Bl. Francoise Pagis Roulleau
Bl. Gabrielle Androuin
St. Jarlath
Bl. Jeanne Bourigault
Bl. Jeanne Fouchard Chalonneau
Bl. Jeanne Gruget Doly
Bl. Jeanne-Marie Sailland d’Epinatz
St. John of the Grating
St. Kinnia
Bl. Louise-Aimee Dean de Luigne
Bl. Louise Rallier de la Tertiniere Dean de Luigne
Bl. Luigi Variara
Bl. Madeleine Blond
Bl. Madeleine Cady
Bl. Madeleine Perrotin Rousseau
Bl. Madeleine Sailland d’Epinatz
Bl. Madeleine Salle
Bl. Marguerite Riviere Huau
Bl. Marguerite Robin
Bl. Marie Cassin
Bl. Marie-Genevieve Poulain de la Forestrie
Bl. Marie Grillard
Bl. Marie-Jeanne Chauvigne Rorteau
Bl. Marie Lenee Lepage Varance
Bl. Marie Leroy Brevet
Bl. Marie Pichery Delahaye
Bl. Marie Roualt Bouju
Bl. Marthe Poulain de la Forestrie
St. Paul of Trois Chateaux
Bl. Perrine Androuin
Bl. Perrine Besson
Bl. Perrine Bourigault
Bl. Perrine Grille
Bl. Perrine-Jeanne Sailland d’Epinatz
Bl. Perrine Laurent
Bl. Perrine Ledoyen
Bl. Perrine Phelyppeaux Sailland
Bl. Perrine-Renee Potier Turpault
Bl. Pierre Tessier
St. Pionius
Bl. Renee Grillard
Bl. Renee Marie Feillatreau
Bl. Renee Martin
Bl. Renee Regault Papin
Bl. Renee Seichet Dacy
Bl. Renee Valin
Bl. Rose Quenion
St. Seiriol
Bl. Simone Chauvigne Charbonneau
Bl. Suzanne Androuin
St. Ursus of Aosta
St. Veridiana
Bl. Victoire Bauduceau Reveillere

Let me be the change I want to be. Even if I am not the light, I can be the spark.  Follow Tweets by @TheOneKinEnt  @Pontifex @CardinalChito Maynila, Pilipinas

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