Posted by: RAM | May 10, 2017

Thursday (May 11): “Whoever receives me receives the one who sent me.”

Mabuhay at Mabuting Balita!
Month of Our Lady
Thursday of the Fourth Week of Easter
Lectionary: 282

First Reading: Acts 13:13-25
Psalms 89:2-3, 21-22, 25, 27: For ever I will sing the goodness of the Lord.
Gospel: 
John 13:16-20
When Jesus had washed the disciples’ feet, he said to them:
“Amen, amen, I say to you, no slave is greater than his master
nor any messenger greater than the one who sent him.
If you understand this, blessed are you if you do it.
I am not speaking of all of you.
I know those whom I have chosen.
But so that the Scripture might be fulfilled,
The one who ate my food has raised his heel against me.
From now on I am telling you before it happens,
so that when it happens you may believe that I AM.
Amen, amen, I say to you, whoever receives the one I send
receives me, and whoever receives me receives the one who sent me.” http://www.usccb.org/bible/readings/051117.cfm

Reflection:   [Link not available yet.]  http://dailyscripture.servantsoftheword.org/readings/2017/may11.htm copyright (c) 2017 Servants of the Word, source:  www.dailyscripture.net, author Don Schwager

Saint of the Day: Saint Ignatius of Laconi (1701-1781)
Ignatius was the son of a poor farmer in Laconi, Italy. He was born on December 17, 1701. When he was about seventeen, he became very ill. He promised to be a Franciscan if he would get better. But when the illness left him, his father convinced him to wait. A couple of years later, Ignatius was almost killed when he lost control of his horse. Suddenly, however, the horse stopped and trotted on quietly. Ignatius was convinced, then, that God had saved his life. He made up his mind to follow his religious vocation at once.

Brother Ignatius never had any important position in the Franciscan order. For fifteen years he worked in the weaving shed. Then, for forty years, he was part of the team who went out from house to house. They requested food and donations to support the friars. Ignatius visited families and received their gift. But the people soon realized that they received a gift in return. Brother Ignatius consoled the sick and cheered up the lonely. He made peace between enemies, converted people hardened by sin and advised those in trouble. They began to wait for his visits.

There were some difficult days, too. Once in a while, a door was slammed in his face, and often the weather was bad. Always, there were miles and miles to walk. But Ignatius was dedicated. Yet people noticed he used to skip one house. The owner was a rich moneylender. He made the poor pay back much more than they could afford. This man felt humiliated because Ignatius never visited his home to ask for donations. He complained to Brother Ignatius’ superior. The superior knew nothing about the moneylender so he sent Ignatius to his home. Brother Ignatius never said a word, but did as he was told. He returned with a large sack of food. It was then that God worked a miracle. When the sack was emptied, blood dripped out. “This is the blood of the poor,” Ignatius explained softly. “That is why I never ask for anything at that house.” The friars began to pray that the moneylender would repent.

Brother Ignatius died at the age of eighty, on May 11, 1781. He was proclaimed a saint by Pope Pius XII in 1951.  http://www.catholic.org/saints/saint.php?saint_id=6982

More Saints of the Day:
Bl. Albert of Bergamo
St. Anastasius VI
St. Anastasius VII
St. Ansfrid
St. Anthimus
Bl. Antonio de Sant’Anna Galvao
St. Evellius
St. Francis Jerome
St. Gangulphus
St. Ignatius of Laconi
Bl. John of Rochester
St. Majolus of Cluny
St. Mamertius
Bl. Matthew Gam
St. Maximus
St. Odilo of Cluny
Bl. Peter the Venerable
St. Tudy of Landevennec
St. Walbert
St. Walter

Let me be the change I want to be. Even if I am not the light, I can be the spark.  Follow Tweets by @TheOneKinEnt  @Pontifex @CardinalChito Maynila, Pilipinas

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